Tag Archives: Metrodora

Of milk and honey II

I have not posted for a while. I got ‘distracted’ writing blog posts on King Attalus’ interest in pharmacology for the Recipes Project and on the use of deer penis and deer antlers for Guerilla Archaeology. As promised though, I … Continue reading

Posted in Cosmetics, History of gynaecology, History of medicine, Homemade remedies | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Crying over spilt milk

 ‘No need to cry over spilt milk’: the person who first came up with that saying surely must never have spent half an hour trying to express an ounce of milk. So goes the ‘joke’ amongst breast-feeding mothers. To me, … Continue reading

Posted in Cosmetics, History of gynaecology, History of medicine, Homemade remedies | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Plus ça change…

Women who choose never to breastfeed sometimes do so for aesthetic reasons: breastfeeding, they argue, will damage their beautiful bosom. Does breastfeeding damage boobs? The jury is out on this one. Breastfeeding advocates maintain that this is one of the … Continue reading

Posted in Children's History, Cosmetics, History of gynaecology, History of medicine, History of veterinary medicine | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

The Milky Way

 So I have gone back to the office… my year of maternity leave has come to an end. It can only be a bitter-sweet moment. Although it was hard work at times, I have enjoyed this year a lot. First … Continue reading

Posted in Children's History, History of gynaecology, History of medicine, Homemade remedies | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 11 Comments

Wake up and smell the coffee

If I were to take a poll and ask what smell people associate most with breakfast, I am sure the most common answer would be ‘coffee’. However, this is a smell I only associated with mornings relatively recently. As a … Continue reading

Posted in Cosmetics, History of medicine, Homemade remedies | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Cinders and ashes

Today I have prepared raw shea-butter for use. Raw, unrefined shea-butter is much cheaper than the prepared variety. It is very easy to prepare: place raw, unrefined shea-butter in a double-boiler (e.g. a glass in a pan of simmering water); … Continue reading

Posted in Cosmetics, History of medicine | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments